Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal and the Persian (Farsi) language

Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal’s family was originally from Basra, Iraq, and belonged to the Arab Banu Shayban tribe. His father was an officer in the Abbasid army in (inhabited by Persians to this day) Khorasan and later settled with his family in Baghdad, where Ahmad was born in 780 CE. Ibn Hanbal had two wives and several children, including an older son, who later became a judge in Sunni (Pre-Safavid) Isfahan. What pretty much unknown, even to many students of knowledge, is that Imam Ahmad could speak fluently Persian!

The forgotten Persian Sunni Empire

The Samanid dynasty (Persian: سامانیان, Sāmāniyān), also known as the Samanid Empire (819–999). It was the first native Persian empire after Arabs ruled Persia for around 300 years. This first ever Persian empire after the Muslim conquest by Caliph ‘Omar Ibn Al-Khattab (may Allah be pleased with him) was not just Muslim but Sunni to the core. The Samanids ruled in Khorassan and Transoxiana. During the era of the Abbasids they ruled as Amirs of Khorasan, appointed by the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad. The Samanids were of Persian dehqan origin with roots stemming from Balkh (to this day a majority Persian-Tajik area in Afghanistan) in present-day northern Afghanistan.They claimed descent from the House of Mihran, high nobility of the Sassanian and Parthian (ancient Khorassan) empires conquered by the Muslims.

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Great Tabaristan – The land that used to produce beacons of Knowledge

A map of northern Iran, ancient Tabaristan.

Tabaristan, also known as Tapuria, was the name of the former historic region in the southern coasts of Caspian Sea roughly in the location of the northern and southern slopes of Elburz range in Iran. The region roughly corresponded to the modern Iranian provinces of Mazandaran, Gilan, Golestan, northern Semnan, and a little part of Turkmenistan.

 

 

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‘Omar Al-Farouq honoured Persians and brought Islam to their lands

11987033_881004561937308_2687720860757521185_nEvery Persian (including Tajik-Persians of Afghanistan/Khorassan and Tajikistan) Muslim should thank Allah for the day He sent ‘Omar Ibn Al-Khattab to bring Islam to the lands of Persia (modern day Iran, Persian/Khorassani parts of Pashtun land/Afghanistan, Persian parts of modern day Uzbekistan such as Bokhara, Samarqand etc.)

If it wasn’t for the mercy of Allah who sent Omar Ibn Al-Khattab[1], then Persians  …

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The Persian Sunni Muslim Samanid Empire

12291840_913355128702251_8228486039471214070_oThe Samanid dynasty (Persian: سامانیان, Sāmāniyān), also known as the Samanid Empire (819–999). It was the first native Persian empire after Arabs ruled Persia for around 300 years. This first ever Persian empire after the Muslim conquest by Caliph ‘Omar Ibn Al-Khattab (may Allah be pleased with him) was not just Muslim but Sunni to the core. The Samanids ruled in Khorassan and Transoxiana. During the era of the Abbasids they ruled as Amirs of Khorasan, appointed by the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad. The Samanids were of Persian dehqan origin with roots stemming from Balkh (to this day a majority Persian-Tajik area in Afghanistan) in present-day northern Afghanistan.They claimed descent from the House of Mihran, high nobility of the Sassanian and Parthian (ancient Khorassan) empires conquered by the Muslims.

 

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The Perso-Arabic script – A beauty & honour for Persia

599px-Khatt-e_NastaliqAfter Muslim conquest of Persia (currently known as Iran), Persians adopted Arabic alphabet for Farsi language by modifying it. They added 4 new letters to 28 letters in Arabic alphabet and thus, the new Persian alphabet -based on Arabic letters- was introduced as 32 letters. Arabic hence served the Persian since even before the arrival of Islam, the Persians used to write in script that also originated from a semite nation, namely the Arameans. The Middle Persian script developed from the Aramaic script and became the official script of the Sassanian empire (224-651 AD). It changed little during the time it was in use, but around the 5th century AD, it spawned a number of new scripts, including the Psalter and Avestan scripts. Essentially there is no “pure” Persian script, hence adopting Arabic (just like Aramaic script in the past) was not forced upon Persians nor did it strip them of their identity (as Anti-Islam bigot and Iranian chauvinists usually claim to tarnish the image of Islam).

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A Pro-Persian (Sunni hadith) that is misused by the Rafidah Shia

THE PROPHET’S PRAISE OF THE PEOPLE OF PERSIA AND THE SHIA DESPERATION OF ATTRIBUTING THE HADITH TO THEMSELVES!

A 50,000 Rial note from Iran. The neo-Safawis have shamelessly printed this PRO-PERSIAN SUNNI hadith on their bank notes.

A 50,000 Rial note from Iran. The neo-Safawis have shamelessly printed this PRO-PERSIAN SUNNI hadith on their bank notes. A Sunni Iranian has written on it challenging the Shias to provide this famous hadith AUTHENTICALLY from their own books.

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Persians in al-Andalus

andalusiabannerWe have already written an article about the Persian origin of the great Muslim scholar Ibn Hazm of Andalusia. The following great article by the bellandalus blog sheds some more light on more famous Persian Sunni scholars of Andalusia

There really needs to be a comprehensive book or article written about the migration of Persians to al-Andalus in the early medieval period and their impact on the cultural and intellectual developments there. It is a little-known fact that there were several waves of migration (primarily of scholars) from the central Islamic lands to the Iberian peninsula between 800 and 1100. The evidence for such a phenomenon definitely exists and we can even trace the origins of a few key personalities, such as Ziryab (d. 857) and Ibn Hazm (d. 1064), back to the Iranian plateau. For the latter, the great fourteenth-century historian al-Dhahabi notes:

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The Turkish Ottomans were fluent in Farsi (Persian)

Did you know that many educated Ottoman Turks (just like Pakistanis a few decades ago) were fluent in Farsi? In fact Farsi was THE language when it came to poetry in the Ottoman empire, this is why basically every Ottoman ruler was raised from childhood on to learn Farsi and to write poems in Farsi.

A portray of Sultan Abdul Hamid II (may Allah have mercy upon him and forgive his sins) and a sample of his handwritten poetry in Persian language and scripts, which was taken from the book "My Father Abdul Hameed," written by his daughter Ayşe ('Aisha) Sultan.

A portray of Sultan Abdul Hamid II (may Allah have mercy upon him and forgive his sins) and a sample of his handwritten poetry in Persian language and scripts, which was taken from the book “My Father Abdul Hameed,” written by his daughter Ayşe (‘Aisha) Sultan.

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Omar’s رضي الله عنه FORETOLD martyrdom & the plot of the Sassanians (Magis/Majoos)

majooshigh  1. THE essential Hadith about the coward Majoosi Kafir who stabbed Omar Al-Farooq during the morning prayer

Narrated ‘Amr bin Maimun (Sahabi):

I saw Omar bin Al-Khattab a few days before he was stabbed in Medina. He was standing with Hudhaifa bin Al-Yaman and Othman bin Hunaif to whom he said, “What have you done? Do you think that you have imposed more taxation on the land (of As-Swad i.e. ‘Iraq) than it can bear?” They replied,

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Safavid Shia manipulation and forging of Sunni literature and scholars

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Q: Please tell me more on what Abdul-Rahmaan Jami writes about the battle of Siffeen and about Ali (RA) is true in his Shawahid un Nubuwwah ‘I testify there is no God but Allah. I testify that Muhammad is the Prophet of Allah, and I testify that Ali is the Wasi of the Prophet Muhammad‘. Is Abdul-Rahman Jami a reliable author or scholar of the Sunni.

A: My response to the incident allegedly quoted by Mawlana Jami follows:

Mawlana ‘Abd ar-Rahman ibn Ahmad al-Jami was a great scholar and Sufi who died in 898 AH. He excelled in various fields, such as grammar, philosophy, logic, theology and jurisprudence, in which field he followed the Hanafi school. In addition he was a refined poet of the Persian language.

 

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The Shia (Rafidi) clergy’s accomplishment: Iranians leaving Islam in droves

Mehdi Bazargan Iran’s first prime minister after the Iranian Revolution of 1979. On 4 February 1979, after the revolution forced the Shah to leave Iran, Bazargan was appointed prime minister of Iran by “Ayatollah” Khomeini. He said a historical statement that couldn’t be closer to the truth, a fact that every Iranian (no matter of what ethnicity, religion or political thought he may be) and many non-Iranians will 100% agree with, weither it be linked to the Iranians outside or inside of Iran. Mehdi Bazargan said:

مصاحبه با مهدی بازرگان ، ماهنامه کیان، 1372:

“حاصل رسالت پيامبر گرامي اسلام پس از 23 سال اين آيه بود که “و ‏رايت الناس يدخلون في دين‌الله افواجا”(و مردم را مي‌بيني که فوج فوج به دين خدا وارد می شوند) ؛ اما پس از گذشت ‏‏15 سال از انقلاب اسلامي، “و رايت الناس “يخرجون” من دين‌الله افواجا” و متاسفانه مردم ايران “خسر الدنيا و ‏الآخرة” شده‌اند… ” ‏

In an interview with Mehdi Bazargan in 1994:

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Rafidi Twelver Shi’ism – A Saba’ite-Safavid-Sassanid conspiracy forced on Persia

Unfortunately many Muslims are not aware of the impressive orthodox-Sunni history of Iran. Many don’t know that Iranians, especially Persians since the arrival of Islam (by the Arab, EHTIOPIAN, ROMAN and PERSIAN companions of the Prophet peace be upon him) to Persia, used to be Muslims (Sunni) and not twelver Shi’ites (Rafidites/Rafidis). In fact the conversation of the people of the Iranian plateau to Islam was a gradual one, and even 300 years after the downfall of the Sasanians there were sizeable Zoroastrian communities in Iran. The Persians were “forced to convert to Islam and attack by “Omar” is nothing but a lie.Never were the Iranian people FORCED to convert to Islam. That is why it took the Iranian nation 300 years to have a substantial Muslim population (READ MORE ABOUT IT HERE).

The only thing the noble people of Persia were forced to was the heretical cult of twelver Shi’ism. Rafidi Shi’ism was mainly alien to Iran, except some regions like Qom and Kashan, Qom in fact was “founded” by Saba’ite Arab Yemenites of the Ash’ari tribe. Other than that, the Persians used to despite Rafidi Shi’ism and Rafidi Shi’ites with passion, Persians and especially Persian scholars (and even poets like Saadi Shirazi the Sunni-to-the-bone) used to write volumes in defence of the Khulafa’ Al-Rashideen, this can be proven through endless works of Shirazi, Isfahani etc. scholars who compiled volumes over volumes in defence of the creed of the Ahlul Sunnah and the refutation of Rafidi Shi’ism. This plain facts simply destroy the lies by the Shia Rafidi clergy that “Persians became Shia from they dot and despised Abu Bakr, Omar and ‘Othman. The same lie has been repeated countless times by Islamophobic Iranians who are happy to adopt Shi’ism as a cover, just for the sake of resisting orthodox Islam, the Islam of Imam Tabari, Ibn Hazm, Abu Hatim Al-Razi Al-Isfahani, Nafe’ Al-Isfahani, Sulayman Ibn Mehran (Al-A’mash), Abu Na’im Al-Isfahani, Saadi Shirazi, Attar, who were all of Persian origin.

Now there  is no doubt that twelver Shi’ism (especially after the Safavid era)  has undergone various changes (into extremes) during history as their major scholars said, what used to be heresy to the Shias of the past is considered from the most essential parts of the Shia religion today. We have chosen the title:

A Saba’ite-Safavid-Sassanid conspiracy forced on Persia, because this is the cocktail of heresy that since the Safavids has been forced on the majority of the Iranians under the pretext of: “Ahl Al-Bayt/Ja’fari/Imami/Shia Twelver” school of thought. Now let’s start with the Sassanid part, and with that we mean the Sassanid/Persian elite, the Majoos who (along with the Zoroastrian priests) used to suppress the non-royal and non-elite of the Persian society, just like in ancient India, Persia was divided into a caste system. Now these Majoos (Sassanid Zoroastrians) who were wiped away by Omar Ibn Al-Khattab, the Farooq who brought Islam to Iran were not sleeping, they, along with other Zanadiqah (heretics) tried to weaken Islam by any means possible. Now it is true that Shi’ism was started by a Yemenite Jew, and certainly not by Persians, but it is also true that the heresy of Tashayyu’ (Shi’ism) after being propagated by a Yemeni Jew was then adopted by Extremist Azeri Sufis (the Safavids) and then finally being advocated by Racist, fashist, Sassanid Persians who saw their chance to destroy Islam from within, especially inside Iran, by adopting and actively supporting Shi’ism, and claiming that the only Islam acceptable for Iranians the Shi’a one.

It did not take much time until Shi’ism after the Safavids was filled with nationalistic Persian elements, in nature absolutely alien to Islam, like the veneration of “Nowrooz” etc all actively advocated by top Shi’a scholars, like Majlisi, the palace scholars of the Safavids. The  Safavids and their forced and brutal conversion of the Muslim Persians (Sunnis) into heresy (Shi’ism) has been well documented.

Race is of no importance according to the teachings of Islam, the only point that should be made is that even though the Safavids (being of Turkish-Azeri origin) dyed their own Shia version with Persian elements (with the support of Persian Islamophobes who wanted to distort the authentic Islam that covered almost all parts of Persia), they themselves were NOT Persians, neither those who were in charge to convert the Persians (i.e. the scholars). This is important to understand that the original ISLAMIC heretige of Persians was Islam and Sunnah (Ahl Al-Sunnah) for over 1000 years of Sunni-Persian history. For Shiism did not become fully established until the reign of Abbas I of Persia (1587–1629)

As for the Safavids (Azeri non-Persians) and their crimes:

‘Methods of converting Iran’

  • Imposing Shiism as the state and mandatory religion for the whole nation and much forcible conversions of Iranian Sufi Sunnis to Shiism [Modern Iran: roots and results of revolution. Nikki R Keddie, Yann Richard, pp. 13, 20. The Encyclopedia of world history: ancient, medieval, and modern. Peter N. Stearns, William Leonard Langer, p. 360. Immortal: A Military History of Iran and Its Armed Forces. Steven R Ward, pg.43]
  • He destroyed Sunni mosques. This was even noted by Tomé Pires, the Portuguese ambassador to China who visited Iran in 1511–12, who when referring to Ismail noted: “He (i.e. Ismail Safawi) reforms our churches, destroys the houses of all Moors who follow (the Sunnah of) Muhammad…” (This is a tradition still practiced by the Shia-Rafidi-Safavid Mullahs of Iran, like under the reign of the AZERI-TURK Khamenei who himself ordered the destruction of the Sheikh Feiz Sunni Mosque of Mashad).
  • He (Ismail I) enforced the ritual and compulsory cursing of the first three Sunni Caliphs (Abu Bakr, Omar, and Othman) as usurpers, from all mosques, disbanded Sunni Tariqahs and seized their assets, used state patronage to develop Shia shrines, institutions and religious art and imported Shia scholars to replace Sunni scholars. [Sources: A new introduction to Islam. Daniel W Brown, p. 191. Encyclopaedic Historiography of the Muslim World. NK Singh, A Samiuddin, p. 90. The Cambridge illustrated history of the Islamic world. Francis Robinson, p. 72.]
  • He shed Sunni blood and destroyed and desecrated the graves and mosques of Sunnis. This caused the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II (who initially congratulated Ismail on his victories) to advise and ask the young monarch (in a “fatherly” manner) to stop the anti-Sunni actions. However, Ismail was strongly anti-Sunni, ignored the Sultans warning and continued to spread the Shia faith by the sword. [Sources: Immortal: A Military History of Iran and Its Armed Forces. Steven R. Ward, p. 44. Iran and America: re-kindling a love lost]. Badi Badiozamani, pp. 174–5.]
  • He persecuted, imprisoned and executed stubbornly resistant Sunnis. [Sources:The Cambridge illustrated history of the Islamic world. Francis Robinson, p. 72Iraq: Old Land, New Nation in Conflict. William Spencer, p. 51.]
  • With the establishment of Safavid rule, there was a very raucous and colourful, almost carnival-like holiday on 26 Dhu al-Hijjah (or alternatively, 9 Rabi’ al-awwal) celebrating the murder of Caliph Omar. The highlight of the day was making an effigy of Omar to be cursed, insulted, and finally burned. However, as relations between Iran and Sunni countries improved, the holiday was no longer observed (at least officially …). [Source:   Culture and customs of Iran. Elton L Daniel, ‘Alī Akbar Mahdī, p. 185]
  • In 1501 Ismail invited all the Shia living outside Iran to come to Iran and be assured of protection from the Sunni majority. [Source: Iraq: Old Land, New Nation in Conflict. William Spencer, p. 51.]
  • The early Safavid rulers took a number of steps against the Sunni Ulema of Iran. These steps included giving the Ulema the choice of conversion, death, or exile [Sources: A new introduction to Islam, By Daniel W. Brown, pg.191^ The Middle East and Islamic world reader, By Marvin E. Gettleman, Stuart Schaar, pg.42^ Immortal: A Military History of Iran and Its Armed Forces, By Steven R. Ward, pg.43]
  • and massacring the Sunni clerics who resisted the Shia transformation of Iran, as witnessed in Herat.[32] As a result, many Sunni scholars who refused to adopt the new religious direction lost their lives or fled to the neighboring Sunni states. [Sources: The failure of political Islam, By Olivier Roy, Carol Volk, pg.170^ Conceptualizing/re-conceptualizing Africa: the construction of African …, By Maghan Keita, pg.90^ Iran: a short history : from Islamization to the present, By Monika Gronke, pg.90]

As for the Saba’ites (Arab-Rafidite Shia clergy) and Sassanid (Persian Majoos) their crimes:

After the conquest, Ismail began transforming the religious landscape of Iran by imposing Twelver Shiism on the populace. Since most of the population embraced Sunni Islam and since an educated version of Shiism was scarce in Iran at the time, Ismail imported a new Shia Ulema corps from traditional Shiite centers of the Arabic speaking lands, such as Jabal Amil (of Southern Lebanon. Many such devils are still active in Iran, one of them is a truly lunatic and polytheist liar dwelling in Qom, who goes by the name AL-KORANI), Bahrain and Southern Iraq in order to create a state clergy. Ismail offered them land and money in return for loyalty. These scholars taught the doctrine of Twelver Shiism and made it accessible to the population and energetically encouraged conversion to Shiism.

To emphasize how scarce Twelver Shiism was then to be found in Iran, a chronicler tells us that only one Shia text could be found in Ismail’s capital Tabriz. Thus it is questionable whether Ismail and his followers could have succeeded in forcing a whole people to adopt a new faith without the support of the Arab Shiite scholars. The rulers of Safavid Persia also invited these foreign Shiite religious scholars to their court in order to provide legitimacy for their own rule over Persia.

Abbas I of Persia, during his reign, also imported more Arab Shia scholars to Iran, built religious institutions for them, including many Madrasahs (religious schools) and successfully persuaded them to participate in the government, which they had shunned in the past (following the Hidden imam doctrine).

[Sources: The failure of political Islam, By Olivier Roy, Carol Volk, pg.170^ The Cambridge illustrated history of the Islamic world, By Francis Robinson, pg.72^ The Middle East and Islamic world reader, By Marvin E. Gettleman, Stuart Schaar, pg.42^ The Encyclopedia of world history: ancient, medieval, and modern … By Peter N. Stearns, William Leonard Langer, pg.360^ Iran: religion, politics, and society : collected essays, By Nikki R. Keddie, pg.91^ Iran: a short history : from Islamization to the present, By Monika Gronke, pg.90^ Shi‘ite Lebanon: transnational religion and the making of national identities, By Roschanack Shaery-Eisenlohr, pg.12-13^ Science under Islam: rise, decline and revival, By S. M. Deen, pg.37]

Shi’ism did not become fully established until the reign of Abbas I of Persia (1587–1629). Abbas hated the Sunnis, and forced the population to accept Twelver Shiism. Thus by 1602 most of the formerly Sunnis of Iran had accepted Shiism (i.e. Iran is majority Shia for about 400 years only). A significant number (until TODAY >Sunnis of Iran<), however, did not accept Safavid rule, prompting Abbas to institute a number of administrative changes in order to further transform Iran into a Twelver Shia state.
Under the guidance of Muhammad Baqir Majlisi (1616–98, one of the most important Shiite clerics of all time who openly believed in the distortion of the Qur’an), who devoted himself to (among other things) the eradication of Sunnism in Iran, the Safavid state made major efforts, in the 17th century to Persianize Shiite practice and culture in order to facilitate its spread in Iran among its Sunni populace. It was only under Majlisi that Shi’a Islam truly took hold among the masses.

Conclusion: The Safavids were a Azeri-Turkish (of Sufi origin) clan that converted to Shi’ism, opposed the Ottomans and used Shi’ism as their tool. They literally massacred the Sunni Persians (and other Iranian people) and forced them into Rafidite-Shi’ism with the help of Arab-Lebanese Rafidite clergy of south Lebanon, Iraq and Bahrain. If anything than the Persians are (generally) victims of Shi’ism for contrary to what many believe, Shi’ism was not started neither carried by Persians, it was carried by Arabs in the past and the Safavid Turks of the past and today (Khamenei is Azeri …) who introduced Shi’ism to Persians and the world with an extra brush of heresy, namely pre-Islamic Zoroastrian-Arab-hating twelver Shi’ism:

Related articles:

Another facete of the Magian (Majoosi) development of Rafidism – The Khurramites

The Role of Zoroastrianism in the Development of Shi’ism

How Shia Safavids collaborated with the British

Shiraz before and after the Safavid onslaught

“Shiraz” (شیراز) was one of the most important centers of knowledge not just in Sunni Persia but in all of the Islamic world, as well as cradle of jurisprudence (Fiqh) and poetry in the history of Iran. Shiraz glimmered like a bright star in the sky of civilization by providing the nation geniuses scholars and experts in both art and knowledge (E’lm). Shiraz flourished a prosperous generation in the past; then it was becoming failure only in Islamic knowledge (elm) after the time when it was haven of the students as they used to com from different parts of the world.
The city of “Shiraz”, the provincial capital of “Fars” located in the southern-western Iran, its area is 340 km, one of the three biggest cities of Iran in terms of area, and it comes in its place after “Tehran” and “Mashhad”. Shiraz ends to “Isfahan” in the north, in eastern side it is surrounded by “Yazd” and “Kerman” and in the south it is closest to “Hormozgan” province, as it ends in western side to “Bushehr”. Its population is more than 1,722,331 inhabitants; Shiraz is the fourth largest city on the map of Iran in terms of population.
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How Shia Safavids collaborated with the British

Were Safavids Persian? No. Safavids were Azerbaijanis. They did choose Shia Islam and with the force of the sword killed and forced hitherto Sunni Iranians to convert to Shia Islam.

When the Shias took over the power in Iran they massacred thousands of people as they were not ready to abandoned Sunnism and convert to Shiism.

The Iranian great historian, Kasrawi wrote that 20 thousand people were killed in Tabriz, capital of Azerbayjan, as the Sunnis refused to become Shia. The urgent pressure for converting the Sunni Muslim of Iran into Shia resulted in the disintegration of Iran as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Gherghizistan, and all parts of Central Asia seceded from Iran. About three million sq m of Iranians soil seceded from Iran as the residents of these places were not prepared to abandon Sunnis in and convert to Shiism.

This is bigger than Karbala.

BRITISH COLLABORATION WITH SAFAVIDS
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The Ottoman Sunni Turks vs. Safavid Shia Turks

 

Were Safavids Persian? Ethnically not, but politicaly yes, as in the sense that they actively promoted and revived Pre-Islamic Persian Sassanian-Zoroastrian traditions under the guise of Shi’ism. Ethnically they were Azeri Turks, Safavids were Azerbaijanis. They did choose Shia Islam and with the force of the sword killed and forced Sunni Iranians to convert to Shia Islam. The Bektashi Sufi Order… Continue reading

Persians forced into becoming Muslim?

There is no doubt that the Safavids forced Shi’ism upon most Iranian, what about the early Muslims who conquered Persia in during the Caliphate of ‘Omar Ibn al-Khattab (may Allah be pleased with him)?

It is widely believed amongst Iranians (including religious Shi’ites) that Arabs somehow enforced Islam upon one of the strongest empires in that the world has ever seen. They seem to have forgotten that prior to the Islamic conquest of Persia, it was the Persian empire that conquered and occupied vast amount lands, including the lands of non-Iranian people, from Egypt right into the cradle of the Arabs, the Yemen. Arab land. As a matter of factthe Persian Sassanid Empire occupied the entire eastern lands of Arabia, parts of Hijaz, Oman and Yemen.

Conquering lands was the norm of the time back then, and in the case of the Muslims, the students, disciples (Sahabah) of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon them), then there are various reports that caliph ‘Omar (may Allah be pleased with him) himself wasn’t keen on getting into any confrontation with the Sassanian empire. It was the Sassanian empire (like the Roman one) that couldn’t tolerate a united Arabia and started mobolising its armies in Iraq. The Muslims had no choice but to face an approaching enemy first, fearlessly:

Rabi’a ibn ‘Amir(radiyallahu ‘anhu) went to the leader of the Persians. The leader asked him, “Why are you coming to our lands? If you are coming for money then we will pay everyone of you a salary so leave us alone.” But Rabi’a said, “That is not why we are here. We are sent to free the creation from being slaves of one another to being slaves of Allah the Creator of the creation and from the oppression of religion to the justice of Islam and we want to deliver people from the narrowness of this world to the vastness of this world and the Afterlife.

 

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